Tuesday, November 7, 2017

AAHI's November 2017 newsletter is out!

The November 2017 issue of AAHI's newsletter is now available online! Please click the image below to read a full-size version of the newsletter. Subscribe to our mailing list today to receive our quarterly newsletters via email!



Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Tackling Diabetes in the Asian American Community

November is National Diabetes Month! Diabetes is a prevalent health concern for Asian Americans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death for this group. Among Asian Americans, Asian Indians have the highest rates of diabetes. Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, and Korean Americans also have higher diabetes rates than non-Hispanic whites despite having lower body weight. Research shows that genetics and the Western lifestyle have led to the high risk of diabetes in Asian Americans. 

Diabetes is a disease in which blood sugar (also known as glucose) levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat turns into glucose for our bodies to use as energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, releases a hormone called insulin into our blood. Insulin helps glucose enter cells in our bodies. If our bodies do not make enough insulin, or the insulin does not work the way it should, glucose stays in the blood and does not reach the cells. Too much glucose in the blood can have negative health consequences such as heart disease, kidney disease, as well as foot, skin, or eye complications. 

According to the CDC, signs and symptoms for diabetes may include: 
• Frequent urination 
• Excessive thirst 
• Unexplained weight loss 
• Extreme hunger 
• Sudden vision changes 
• Tingling or numbness in hands or feet 
• Feeling very tired much of the time 
• Very dry skin • Sores that are slow to heal 
• More infections than usual 

Some people with diabetes do not have any of these signs or symptoms. The only way to know if someone has diabetes is to have his/her doctor do a blood test. 

The three main types of diabetes are Type 1, Type 2, and gestational diabetes. Diabetes can be developed at any age and affects both men and women. 
• Type 1 – In Type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells, which are the only cells in the body that make insulin. 
• Type 2 – Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition where cells do not use insulin properly. Gradually, the pancreas loses its ability to produce insulin. 
• Gestational diabetes – Gestational diabetes results in glucose intolerance diagnosed during pregnancy. If not treated, it can cause problems for mothers and babies. 

Researchers are unsure how exactly to prevent Type 1 diabetes since it is mainly caused by genetics, but it is still important to eat a balanced diet and exercise regularly. When it comes to Type 2 diabetes, prevention is critical. It is especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if a person is at increased risk of diabetes, for example, if a person is overweight or has a family history of the disease. Making a few simple changes in a person’s lifestyle may help him/her avoid serious health complications, such as nerve, kidney, and heart damage. Preventing or delaying Type 2 diabetes starts with eating healthier foods and being more physically active. It is recommended to lose a small amount of weight (5% to 7% of total body weight) through a well-balanced diet and 30 minutes of exercise at least five days a week. 

The CDC recommends that people age 45 and older get tested for diabetes. Those over age 45 with normal blood glucose levels, should continue to get tested every three years. Those under age 45, but at high risk of developing diabetes, should be tested more frequently. Some risk factors include obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension, and diagnosis of gestational diabetes. 

If you are a Montgomery County resident, limited-income, and uninsured, you can contact Montgomery Cares Clinics to learn more about diabetes screenings. Please call Montgomery County’s non-emergency information line, MC311, at 240-777-0311. You can also contact the Asian American Health Initiative for more information at 240-777-4517 or info@AAHIinfo.org.

Friday, October 27, 2017

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

This October, AAHI is proud to participate in National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer is the second most common kind of cancer in women. About 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point.

The good news is that most women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early.
  • If you are a woman age 40 to 49, talk with your doctor about when to start getting mammograms and how often to get them.
  • If you are a woman age 50 to 74, be sure to get a mammogram every 2 years. You may also choose to get them more often.

Talk to a doctor about your risk for breast cancer, especially if a close family member of yours had breast or ovarian cancer. Your doctor can help you decide when and how often to get mammograms.

Eligible low income, uninsured Montgomery County women can receive breast and cervical cancer screenings. These screenings include a yearly clinical breast exam and a free mammogram, and a cervical cancer screening exam including a pelvic exam and Pap test. Diagnosis, nursing case management and follow up care is provided as needed. The program helps link women to other community and state resources and provides cancer outreach and education.

  • To apply: Call 240-777-1750 or apply in person at the program offices, 2424 Reedie Drive, Suite 218, Wheaton, MD  20902.  
  • Eligibility Requirements:
    • Women must be between 40 and 64 years of age
    • Montgomery County resident
    • Uninsured and have household income at or below 250% of the federal poverty guidelines.
    • Proof of income such as pay stubs and income tax returns.  

For more information, visit AAHI's Resource Library at http://aahiinfo.org/resources/resource-library/ and click on "Cancer Screening Guidelines".


National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Recap: ECHO Workshop #14 "Maintaining Health and Financial Security as We Age"

On October 17th, AAHI, in partnership with the African American Health Program, the Latino Health Initiative, and the Community Action Agency, hosted our 14th Empowering Community Health Organizations (ECHO) Workshop! This workshop, "Maintaining Health and Financial Security as We Age", is the last of our three part series focusing on the needs, impacts, and opportunities of an aging community. A new series will begin in the spring of 2018.

Our ECHO Project is a series of professional and practical training workshops designed to build the capacity and sustainability of community organizations.

Prior to the workshop, attendees were able to visit our resource for information on various services and programs available for older residents.





The workshop was conducted in a panel discussion format and representatives from the Montgomery Department of Health and Human Services Aging and Disability Services, the Social Security Administration, the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), and the Coalition for the Advancement of Financial Education (C.A.F.E. Montgomery MD) were invited to talk about the importance of planning ahead as we age and understanding the health and financial demands that may arise along with aging.




Over 70 attendees, representing close to 40 organizations, came to the workshop. Thank you to our wonderful panelists, Steering Committee, and staff for making this a successful event. We look forward to seeing you again in our spring 2018 ECHO Workshop!

Please click here to read the Workshop Summary (5MB) where you will find electronic version of the handouts from the workshop.
Please click on the image below to see more photos from the night!




Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Activity Recap: Guru Nanak Foundation of America Health Fair

On September 24, AAHI participated in the Guru Nanak Foundation of America (GNFA) Health Fair hosted by GNFA and American Diversity Group. Despite the heat, participants were very enthusiastic to come to our Resource Information table and to participate in the bone density screening. Our health promoters were able to provide outreach and education on topics such as hepatitis B, blood pressure, diabetes, and mental health. Thank you for having us, GNFA!

Click on the picture below for more photos from the health fair!


Thursday, September 21, 2017

Prepare Yourself Before Disaster Strikes


Do you know what to do when an emergency happens?

As part of the National Preparedness Month in September, the Department of Homeland Security is encouraging the public to create an action plan before an emergency occurs. It is important to have a plan in place so that you can better respond to the unexpected.

There are four key things you can do:
(1) stay informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur and their appropriate responses
(2) make a family emergency plan, 
(3) build an emergency supply kit, and
(4) get involved in your community by taking action to prepare for emergencies.

This brochure from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides detailed information on how to prepare for disasters. You can find the PDF version here and it is also available here in multiple languages including Chinese, Korean, Hindi, and Vietnamese.



In addition, do you know how to get in contact with family members if you are not all together when an emergency happens? Have a family discussion before an emergency happens to determine who would be your point of contact, both in your neighborhood and our of town. It is also important to note that unless you are in danger, send a text to communicate. Texts may have an easier time getting through than phone calls, and you do not want to tie up phone lines needed by emergency workers.

Use this Family Communication Plan to assist you in organizing emergency contacts such as phone numbers and meeting place for your family! You can find the PDF version here.



Monday, September 18, 2017

National Healthy Lunch Day!

With your demanding career and busy family lives, it may be challenging to have a healthy meal. As part of the National Healthy Lunch Day on September 19, 2017, the American Diabetes Association
has provided tips on how to prepare quick and healthy lunches!

Here’s how to put together good-for-you foods to make a satisfying and healthy lunch:
  1. Put a healthy spin on the traditional sandwich. Use two pieces of thin, whole grain bread and include two ounces reduced-sodium lean turkey, hummus, spinach, bell pepper slices, and/or mustard. Add some carrot sticks and light ranch dressing on the side. 
  2. Mix together some cooked quinoa, rinsed and drained canned white beans, chopped bell pepper, carrots, and broccoli to make a whole grain and veggie salad. Toss with some olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Add a nectarine or some grapes on the side and a small handful of dry roasted almonds, if desired. 
  3. Make a tuna salad with canned light tuna packed in water, light mayo, diced celery, lemon juice, and freshly ground pepper. Serve it over greens with an apple and peanut butter on the side. 
  4. Build a quick yogurt parfait with nonfat plain Greek yogurt, diced no-sugar-added canned pineapple, and a sprinkle of pecans to top it off. 
  5. Pack a cup of leftover chili or vegetable soup. Top it with some fresh tomatoes and nonfat plain yogurt instead of sour cream. 
  6. Fill a whole wheat tortilla wrap with rotisserie chicken, hummus, and greens. For more veggie goodness, add roasted or fresh pepper strips. 
  7. Pack a hard-boiled egg, a piece of fruit, a string cheese stick, and five whole wheat crackers. And bring as many carrot or celery sticks as you like! 
  8. Throw together a salad with romaine lettuce or spinach and any other non-starchy vegetables that you like. Top with some grilled chicken, feta cheese, a sprinkle of chopped nuts, and a tablespoon of light salad dressing.


Monday, August 21, 2017

Take the Adult Vaccine Quiz!

Vaccination is important for everyone of all ages and the need for vaccinations does not end in childhood. Every year 700,000 to 1.4 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B, with complications such as liver cancer, which could be prevented if vaccination is received in a timely manner.

Unfortunately, not all adults are receiving the recommended vaccines, leaving themselves and their loved ones vulnerable to serious preventable diseases. According to the National Health Interview Survey 2014, only 20% of adults 19 years or older had received Tdap vaccination and less than half of adults 18 years or older received a flu vaccine during the 2014-2015 flu season.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has an easy multiple choice quiz that lets you find out which vaccines you may need. The recommendations for adults 19 years and older are based on age, health conditions, job, lifestyle, travel, and other factors. Click on the link https://www2.cdc.gov/nip/adultimmsched/ and take the quiz!

Once you get the list of vaccines you may need, bring the list with you when you visit your primary care doctor and discuss steps you can take to get up to date with your vaccinations. If you are a Montgomery County resident, low income, uninsured, and need primary care, you can contact Montgomery Cares Clinics through MC311 by dialing 240-777-0311.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Free Vaccinations Offered at Health Clinics for Students Entering Seventh Grade

We all need shots (also called vaccinations or immunizations) to help protect us from serious diseases. To help keep our community safe, Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services’ Immunization Program is offering free vaccinations for students entering seventh grade.

Montgomery County health officials urge parents of students entering seventh grade to be sure their students show proof of vaccination against Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) and Meningococcal meningitis (MCV4) prior to the start of the 2017-2018 school year.  Students not in compliance with Maryland vaccination requirements will be excluded from attending school until they provide documentation of the required Tdap and MCV immunizations.  The requirements are in place throughout the State of Maryland.

Free Tdap and MCV4 immunizations will be offered to incoming students at the following locations:

School Health Services Center
4910 Macon Road, Rockville
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

2000 Dennis Avenue, Silver Spring
Tuesdays
8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
12900 Middlebrook Road, 2nd floor, Germantown
Wednesdays 8:30 a.m. – 12 noon
Thursdays 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

8630 Fenton Street, 10th floor, Silver Spring
Wednesdays 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

A copy of the child’s immunization record must be presented to staff to receive vaccinations.  For more information on immunizations, call the Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services’ Immunization Program at 240-777-1050 or School Health Services at 240-777-1550.


Monday, July 24, 2017

Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Stigma towards mental health and receiving mental healthcare exists within many Asian American communities.To say that Asian Americans do not experience mental health concerns is a myth; it is, in fact, an extension of the Model Minority Myth, or the false stereotype that lumps all Asian Americans together as being wealthy, highly educated, well-adjusted to the US, and healthy—including mentally healthy.

According to Mental Health America, about 5.4% of the US population identifies as Asian American or Pacific Islander and about 13% of those individuals have a diagnosable mental disorder—that equates to about 2.2 million people. Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death for Asian Americans, but the second leading cause of death among Asian Americans between 15 and 24 and the third leading cause of death among 25-34 year-olds. When you look closely at research, you find more information: on depression, anxiety, intimate partner violence—all mental health issues that exist within and affect the Asian American community.

Despite these data, barriers to seeking and receiving mental health care exist. Relative to other US populations, Asian Americans are three times less likely to see a mental health provider. Even if Asian Americans do access mental health care, they are more likely to stop receiving care early in the treatment process. The struggles of dealing with stigma towards mental health also affect local Asian Americans living in Montgomery County, Maryland. A study done with Asian American young adults in Montgomery County identified six main barriers to seeking mental health care, one of which was stigma and negative perceptions of those seeking counseling.

As part of Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, if you find that you or a loved one needs additional help, the Asian American Health Initiative (AAHI), a part of Montgomery County’s Department of Health and Human Services, encourages you to contact your primary care doctor. You may also contact Montgomery County Access to Behavioral Health Services at 240-777-1770, which offers free mental health screenings and referrals both over the phone and in person. If you are a Montgomery County resident, low income, uninsured, and need primary care, you can contact Montgomery Cares Clinics through MC311 by dialing 240-777-0311.



Tuesday, June 27, 2017

National HIV Testing Day

Today, in honor of National HIV Testing Day, AAHI encourages you to get tested for HIV. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes AIDS.

The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested. Many people with HIV don’t have any symptoms. In the United States, 1 in 8 people living with HIV don't know they have it.

Even if you do not feel sick, getting early treatment for HIV is important. Early treatment can help you live a longer, healthier life. Treatment can also make it less likely that you will pass HIV on to other people.

Am I at risk for HIV? 
HIV is spread through some of the body’s fluids, like blood, semen (cum), vaginal fluids, and breast milk. HIV is passed from one person to another by:

• Having sex (vaginal, anal, or oral) without a condom or dental dam with a person who has HIV
• Sharing needles with someone who has HIV
• Breastfeeding, pregnancy, or childbirth if the mother has HIV
• Getting a transfusion of blood that’s infected with HIV (very rare in the United States)

Under the Affordable Care Act, the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover HIV testing. Talk to your insurance company to learn more.

Free HIV testing is also available:
Montgomery County STD/HIV Testing Program
Locations: 2000 Dennis Avenue, Silver Spring
Upcounty Regional Services Center, Germantown
Call to make an appointment
240-777-1760
The program provides testing and treatment for Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) for Montgomery County residents only. Free, anonymous and confidential HIV testing is open to all and includes pre-test counseling and post-test counseling. For more information, please click here.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

5 Ways to Make the Most of Your Health Coverage



In the United States, an estimated 12.7 million people signed up for coverage in the 2016 Open Enrollment, allowing them to gain or renew access to the health coverage they need. Enrolling in a health plan, however, is only the initial step. To help you go from coverage to care, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has created resources in multiple languages, available at no cost, to help you understand your benefits and connect to a primary care provider and preventive services.

Here are five ways to make the most of your health coverage:


  1. Confirm your coverage: Be sure your enrollment is complete. Contact your health plan and/or state Medicaid office. Pay your premium if you have one, so you can use your health coverage when you need it.
  2. Know where to go for answers: Contact your health plan to see what services are covered, and what your costs will be. Read the Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You to learn about key health insurance terms, like coinsurance and deductible.
  3. Find a provider: Select a health care provider in your network who will work with you to get your recommended health screenings. Remember you might pay more if you see a provider who is out-of-network.
  4. Make an appointment: Confirm your provider accepts your coverage. Talk to your provider about preventive services. Ask questions about your concerns and what you can do to stay healthy.
  5. Fill your prescriptions: Some drugs cost more than others. Ask in advance how much your prescription costs and if there is a more affordable option.

Share these tips with your family and friends so they too can make the most of their health
coverage and live a long healthy life. Also, check out the Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You for a step-by-step guide on how to use your coverage and more detailed health insurance information.

For more information about From Coverage to Care, visit http://go.cms.gov/c2c.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Recap: ECHO Workshop #13 "Aging in Montgomery County: Building a Safer Community Together"

On May 16th, AAHI, in partnership with the African American Health Program, the Latino Health Initiative, and the Community Action Agency, hosted our 13th Empowering Community Health Organizations (ECHO) Workshop! This workshop, "Aging in Montgomery County: Building a Safer Community Together", is the second of our three part series focusing on the needs, impacts, and opportunities of an aging community. The last part of this series will follow in the fall of 2017.

Our ECHO Project is a series of professional and practical training workshops designed to build the capacity and sustainability of community organizations.

Prior to the workshop, attendees were able to visit our resource for information on services and programs available for residents related to the safety of older people.




The workshop was conducted in a panel discussion format and representatives from the Montgomery Department of Health and Human Services Aging and Disability Services, the Police Department, the Department of Fire and Rescue Services, the State's Attorney's Office, and the Long Term Care Ombudsman were invited to talk about the importance of elder safety and ways and resources available to the community on elder abuse prevention.




Over 100 attendees, representing 47 organizations, came to the workshop. Thank you to our wonderful panelists, Steering Committee, and staff for making this a successful event. We look forward to seeing you again in our fall 2017 ECHO Workshop!

Please click here to read the Workshop Summary (4MB) where yo will find electronic version of the handouts from the workshop.

Please click on the image below to see more photos from the night!



Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Recap: AAHI Outreach Activities

Spring time is one of AAHI's busiest outreach seasons! During the past couple of weeks, AAHI participated in 8 different outreach activities and there are many more to come!

On April 14, AAHI hosted our Resource Information Table at the Bait-Ur-Rehman Mosque. We distributed general health information and education on different health topics such as cancer and mental health. We also introduced community members to different programs and services available in Montgomery County.

Click here to see more photos!

Over the weekend of April 15 and 16, we attended the Cambodian New Year Festival, the Sri Lankan New Year Festival, and the Wat Thai New Year Festival. As part of the New Year celebrations, there were many cultural activities and festive foods available. We distributed general health information and local resources available at our Resource Information Table. Our Health Promoters provided outreach and education on several health topics, including breast cancer, hepatitis B, osteoporosis, local resources, diabetes, and patient-physician communication. We would like to thank the Cambodian Buddhist Society, the Maryland Buddhist Viharaya, and the Wat Thai Washington, D.C. for having us!

Click on the photos below to see more photos from the events!
     


Have you heard about Friends' Corner? Friends' Corner is one of AAHI's newest projects focusing on the health and wellness of older adults in the Asian American community. Unlike a regular workshop, Friends' Corner provides a welcoming place for older adults to gather informally and learn about health related topics and resources in a relaxing environment. We hope through this project, older adults will have the opportunity to mingle and build bonds with others in the community.

Click on the photos below to see photos from Friends' Corner!



Check back on our blog soon for other updates!

Thursday, April 13, 2017

AAHI's April 2017 newsletter is now available!

The April 2017 issue of AAHI's newsletter is now available online! Please click the image below to read a full-size version of the newsletter. Subscribe to our mailing list today to receive our quarterly newsletters via email!



Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Recap: Gaithersburg High School and Watkins Mill High School Health Fair


Over the past two weeks, AAHI attend two health fairs at two high schools in Montgomery County!

On March 31, AAHI attended the Gaithersburg High School Annual Health Fair featuring various health vendors who shared information on their services. Students had the opportunity to learn about a range of topics including community resources and diseases that affects Asian Americans disproportionately. Many participated in our Breast Self-Exam (BSE) demonstration and were interested in learning more about cancer. Compared to previous years, students were also more open to talk about mental health.



On April 6, AAHI attended the Watkins Mill High School Annual Health Fair hosted by the Watkins Mill High School Wellness Center. This was the third time AAHI attended the health fair. Other than providing general health information and educational resources for the students, our Behavioral Health Program Coordinator was also there to discuss mental health issues within the community. Numerous students approached our table during the event and were receptive and eager to learn. They were enthusiastic in trying out our Wheel of Health Education and many took our mental health photonovels.



Thank you Gaithersburg High School and Watkins Mill High School for having AAHI at your health fair! We had a great time and we hope to come back next year!

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Register Now for ECHO #13 "Aging in Montgomery County: Building a Safer Community Together"

The Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services' (MCDHHS) Office of Community Affairs and Aging and Disability Services would like to invite you to participate in a free training workshop as part of the Empowering Community Health Organizations (ECHO) Project 2017.

This FREE workshop, entitled "Aging in Montgomery County: Building a Safer Community Together", is the second in a three-part series focusing on the health and social needs of older adults and their families. The workshop will be held on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 from 5:30 PM to 8:00 PM at the Silver Spring Civic Building, Great Hall, One Veterans Place, Silver Spring, MD 20910.

The workshop aims to raise awareness on elder abuse and provide resources to community leaders to improve the safety of older adults in their communities. Representatives from various Montgomery County and state agencies will be brought together to discuss issues of abuse, neglect, and exploitation (particularly financial exploitation) among older adults. Attendees will also learn about warning signs and prevention strategies that promote a safer aging community.

In addition, a resource fair will be held before the workshop from 5:00 PM to 6:00 PM. Local organizations and programs will be in attendance to provide information and resources for older adults.

Registration is required due to limited space. Please RSVP by Friday, May 1, 2017. You can register online at http://conta.cc/2nMyRFc or by calling Diem-Thanh (Tanya) Dang, AAHI Program Assistant, at 240-777-4517.

If you have any questions, or if you are unable to register, please contact Ms. Dang via telephone or email at Diem-Thanh.Dang@montgomerycountymd.gov. We hope you will join us in building a healthier community!


Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Recap: Health Promoter Senior Health 101 Training

On February 23, AAHI hosted another bi-monthly Health Promoter Training focusing on senior health. We were fortunate to have Dr. Erin K. Smith from Aging and Disability Services, Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services, as the speaker for the training. Health Coaches from the Wellness and Independence for Seniors at Home (WISH) program also joined us for the training.



Did you know that by 2040, the older population in Montgomery County is projected to grow more than double? It is important for the Health Promoters to learn about the emerging older Asian American demographics and health disparities related to aging, which allows us to better understand healthy aging and ways to think about aging more positively.

Our Health Promoters thoroughly enjoyed the training and the interactive activity. We would like to thank Erin for coming during her busy schedule and giving us such a great training!



If you have missed the training, you can click on this link to access the presentation http://aahiinfo.org/phpages/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Gerontology-101_Final.pdf

Click on the picture below to see more pictures from the evening!



Monday, February 13, 2017

Activities Recap: Mental Health First Aid Training and CCACC Lunar New Year Festival

AAHI hopes that you are staying warm in this windy weather! Even though the weather may be cold, AAHI has been out and about connecting with our community members.

On February 4, AAHI hosted our third Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training with members from the Chinese Bible Church of Maryland (CBCM) and Gaithersburg Chinese Alliance Church (GCAC). Mental Health First Aid is a national curriculum-based certification training that teaches on how to help people developing a mental illness or in a crisis. In total, there were over 30 attendees who became certified in Mental Health First Aid.


AAHI would like to thank the EveryMind for providing the facilitator and training. We would also like to thank CBCM for providing the venue for the training. Last but not least, AAHI would like to thank all CBCM and GCAC members for coming and we greatly appreciate your enthusiasm throughout the training!

Click here or the image below to see more pictures from the training!


On February 5, AAHI attended the Lunar New Year Festival at Lakeforest Mall hosted by the Chinese Culture and Community Service Center. Our health promoters were able to provide outreach and education on topics such as hepatitis B, blood pressure, diabetes, and mental health. Many community members stopped by our Resource Information Table and we were able to have in depth conversations with them regarding their health. Thank you for having us, CCACC!

Click here or the image below to see more pictures from the training!



Remember to keep up with the latest news at AAHI by following us on Facebook and Twitter! For details of upcoming AAHI events, please click onto the calendar on the left. Stay warm and we hope to see you soon!

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Event Recap: Maryland Lunar New Year Tet Festival, CASSA Presentation, Health Promoter Orientation

Over the past two weeks, AAHI attended two outreach activities in the community!

On January 15, AAHI attended the Lunar New Year Tet Festival organized by the Association of Vietnamese Americans (AVA) at Northwood High School in Silver Spring. AAHI provided general health information on topics such as cancer, hepatitis B, mental health, and the Affordable Care Act at our Resource Table.




Then on January 17, AAHI presented to members of the Chinese American Senior Services Association (CASSA) at the Upper County Community Center in Gaithersburg. We provided an introduction of our projects and services to community members and also gave suggestions on other senior related resources and services available in Montgomery County.

Click on photo above for more pictures!
We would like to thank AVA and CASSA for inviting us to their activities! AAHI had a great time interacting with community members.

Additionally, AAHI brought on board three new Health Promoters who attended their orientation yesterday. During the orientation, our new Health Promoters learned about AAHI and the health disparities in the Asian American community. We are excited to have new members joining our growing team and we cannot wait to go to outreach activities with you! Welcome to AAHI!